EL Civics for ESL Students
Presidents Day Banner Showing George Washington in New York


Presidents Day Lesson

by www.elcivics.com

Presidents Day can also be written as President's Day or Presidents' Day. Presidents Day started as a holiday to celebrate George Washington's birthday on February 22, but was changed to the third Monday in February in 1971. Presidents Day is a federal holiday, so federal offices, schools, post offices, and many banks are closed. Although it is a federal holiday, almost all private businesses and stores are open. Over time, the holiday has expanded to honor Abraham Lincoln, and it is gradually starting to include all of the U.S. Presidents. In the middle of February, grade schools have assemblies, concerts, and plays about Presidents Washington and Lincoln. Some stores have special Presidents Day sales and many towns have patriotic parades or assemblies.  (3 pages)

Portrait of George Washington, 1732-1799

When is Presidents Day?

  • It is on the third Monday of February. In 2014, it is on Monday, February 17.
  • Presidents Day is an American holiday to honor George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and all the other presidents.
  • Presidents Day is a federal holiday, so federal offices, schools, post offices, and many banks are closed. Most private businesses are open on Presidents Day.

 

Battle of Yorktown, Surrender of Cornwallis to George Washington

Who was George Washington?

  • He was a general of the American troops during the American Revolutionary War. He became the first President of the United States.
  • Washington is called the "Father of Our Country."

 

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